Did your doctor tell you that “Your baby has Neonatal Jaundice”?

Did your doctor tell you that “Your baby has Neonatal Jaundice”?

Jaundice

Did your doctor tell you that “Your baby has Neonatal Jaundice”? Jaundice is a scary word as it may sound but Neonatal Jaundice or new born Jaundice is relatively less dangerous and worrisome.

I will start this blogpost with my own story. If you want to skip this please feel free to jump to “How to Check”

Our Story

To start with I had a normal delivery, and when Adi was born, we were so elated that we decided to throw a party when he was just 10 days old. All the bookings were done, invitations were sent out and on the BIG day we had an appointment with doctor. He checked Adi and suggested a blood test. A blood test for 10 days old was enough to put me in panic mode, still we got the test done.. My little baby cried a lot!!

We returned home and the party was scheduled to start at 7 in the evening. At 4 PM we got a call from hospital that he has Neonatal Jaundice and his Bilirubin levels are high and we need to admit him urgently to NICU. Listening to this made us feel like everything got upside down and we rushed to hospital, informed all the guests that the party is not happening, cancelled the event, As everything was done at the last moment we had to pay the entire amount (anyways that does not matter much).

In Hospital they kept him under blue light in an incubator kind of thing, covering his eyes with something and he was only in his diapers without any clothes. Seeing my little baby in that situation gave me the worst feeling I can’t explain . Anyways he was there for 4 days, and everyday the bloodtests happened to check the bilirubin levels, and I had to visit every 2 hours to feed the baby (This was the only relief that I got to see him every 2 hours) and trust me amidst all of these I became a zombie (LOL). I was sleep deprived and didnot feel like eating anything.

So this was my story.. This might seem overwhelming but what I came to know after that is- this is a very common thing in newborns. What we need to do is keep a check on the same as very high levels can have some adverse effects.



 

How to check for Neonatal Jaundice-

1. Two finger test- gently press the babys’s skin on forehead, tummy and foot sole, if it appears yellow, he/ she may have mild levels.

2. White portion of eyes- Check the white portion of eye. if it appears yellowish.

3. pale stools – breast-fed babies should have greenish-yellow stools, while those of bottle fed babies should be a greenish-mustard color.

4. dark urine – a newborn’s urine should be colorless.

5. poor sucking or feeding.

6. drowsiness.

 

How to avoid it from increasing-

Almost 60% babies have this condition of mild Jaundice between 3-15 (in some cases upto 3 weeks) days after birth. The levels is expected to fall down after the 9-11 days. What we can do to avoid the levels from rising is to keep the baby in morning sunlight during the first few days of baby after birth(This is not a medical process but something which has been passed on from our ancestors and trust me it actually works).

Morning sunlight
Morning sunlight( between 7am to 11am) is known to have many good effects on babies. Out of many good things that it does it also brings down the bilirubin level.

Doctors intervention.
whenever you have a little doubt that something is not right, consult the pediatrician. If required they will suggest admission and will keep baby under blue light. That really helps to bring the levels down. And there is nothing to panic about (I learned this later). You will see many other babies over there and they all are doing just fine. And the best part is you can take the baby home in 3-4 days(as per doctors advice.)

*If you can relate to this please share your experiences in the comments section.

 

Please also read-

Common cold in toddlers- Best home remedies

Deworming in children

3 Replies to “Did your doctor tell you that “Your baby has Neonatal Jaundice”?”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *